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Posts tagged "television"

alisonbrieweb:

Matt Lucas has been cast to star in the new season of Community.

In a move that should make Community fans a little less wary of the Dan Harmon-less Season 4, the show has cast British comedian Matt Lucas as Greendale’s newest faculty member.

Lucas will appear in multiple episodes as a history professor who used to teach at Oxford and whose commitment to academic rigor is a challenge to the community college’s learning environment, TVLine has learned exclusively. But as Ask Ausiello hinted a few weeks ago, the prof’s polished exterior may be hiding a trainwreck of a personal life.

Best known to American audiences as one of Kristen Wiig’s roommates in Bridesmaids, Lucas made a name for himself in the British sketch comedy series Little Britain. An American version of the show later aired on HBO.

Community‘s fourth season premieres Friday, Oct. 19.

Source

Original Article

(via communitythings)

popculturebrain:

Outstanding Drama Series

  • Boardwalk Empire
  • Breaking Bad
  • Downton Abbey
  • Game Of Thrones
  • Homeland
  • Mad Men

Outstanding Comedy Series

  • Curb Your Enthusiasm
  • Girls
  • Modern Family
  • 30 Rock
  • Veep

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Comedy Series

  • Lena Dunham as Hannah Horvath
  • Melissa McCarthy as…

entertainmentweekly:

The Interactive Emmy Watch Wheel!

Zooey Deschanel chats about S&M, Tina Fey discusses Liz Lemon’s maternal future, Alison Brie talks the Dreamatorium, Aaron Paul gives the scoop on Breaking Bad, and so much more. But actually so much more. Like, we couldn’t fit it all on one wheel, so we had to make two. Because that’s how many interviews we had.

(via communitythings)

True story, bro.

communitythings:

mel616:

Community Has a Return Date: October 19th! 

My life revolves around TV - and not even actual television, more of TV shows watched on a laptop on my own time. So yeah.

popculturebrain:

thetvscreen:

This is gonna be a sad night.

House ends tonight.

Sigh. Although I haven’t been tuned in for quite some time now, about three-four seasons unupdated… still. It was just a matter of time. Huzzah for House! Here’s to finding out what happened in those seasons. :D

popculturebrain:

thetvscreen:

This is gonna be a sad night.

House ends tonight.

Sigh. Although I haven’t been tuned in for quite some time now, about three-four seasons unupdated… still. It was just a matter of time. Huzzah for House! Here’s to finding out what happened in those seasons. :D

scienceetfiction:

Dollhouse (2009-2010), created by Joss Whedon 

A mysterious laboratory programs people, called “dolls” to give them a personality to accomplish a specific task, then erase their memory.  

A good series about an audacious theme.  Most of the time, the dolls are used to sleep with someone (with an implanted sentiment of love), but the series doesn’t show this directly and it’s not the usage of the dolls we see the most often (if it had been made by HBO, it could have been different).  It starts (relatively) simple, like an adventure series, and then, gradually, the universe expands.   There are only two seasons of 13 episodes, but they are well employed. The series has a beginning, a middle and an end.   In Dollhouse, science fiction is not only a background. The scenario explores several possibilities of the initial concept and the consequences of this technology.  

I have been meaning to watch this series for the looooooooongest time because:

a. Joss Whedon,

b. Alan Tudyk,

c. Eliza Dushku,

and d. JOSS WHEDON.

Sigh. Oh, when?

popculturebrain:

In case you needed reinforcing as to why last night’s episode was monumental. (The below is merely an excerpt form Seitz’s blog post.)

And as in “Critical Film Studies” — still the show’s aesthetic peak, though this episode came close — you got to see the show’s actors show off their chops in service of a story. When we were watching Abed “play” Jeff Winger, we were not seeing Jeff, but Abed’s conception of Jeff, which was plenty intriguing. But there was something equally thrilling happening at the level of pure performance: We were seeing Joel McHale play Jeff Winger as imagined by Abed. McHale was channeling aspects of Danny Pudi’s screen presence (the intense stare, the birdlike head movements and jabbing hand gestures, the slightly clipped delivery) even as he was playing “himself.”

I’ve read elsewhere that Pudi should get an Emmy for this episode, and I’d be delighted if he got one. He deserved one for “Critical Film Studies,” in which he played Abed playing Andre Gregory in My Dinner With Andre while dissecting his self-image in a candid, unexpectedly serious conversation with Jeff. But it would be ironic indeed if this were the episode that finally won Pudi some kind of industry recognition for his brilliance, because much of our insight into Abed came via McHale’s performance as Abed/Jeff, and from Alison Brie’s equally complex but more emotionally direct performance as Annie, who struggled to separate her feelings about Abed from her feelings for Jeff.

I can’t think of many shows in the history of American network TV that have managed Community’s trick of being pretty much like every sitcom you’ve ever seen and like nothing you’ve seen anywhere, in any medium. It’s at once a goofy, shenanigans-driven comedy, a self-aware commentary on pop culture, and an examination of ethical and philosophical concepts, and it demands to be viewed on all three levels simultaneously; that’s a lot to ask of people who are mainly looking to unwind on Thursday night.